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Flu Clinics 2018/19 – Open for booking

Our Saturday Flu clinics are now open for booking, running on the following;

Saturday 15th September 9am – 12pm

Saturday 6th October 9am – 12pm

Saturday 20th October 9am – 12pm

Saturday 17th November 9am – 12pm

Call reception after 9.30am to book for a flu clinic on 01444 458022

Patients are eligible for the Flu Vaccine if you are in any of the following catergories:

  • anyone aged 65 and over
  • pregnant women
  • children and adults with an underlying health condition (such as long-term heart or respiratory disease)
  • children and adults with weakened immune systems

Who should get the flu vaccine?

For 2018, there are 3 types of flu vaccine:

  • A LIVE QUADRIVALENT vaccine (which protects against 4 strains of flu), given as a nasal spray. This is for children and young people aged 2 to 17 years eligible for the flu vaccine
  • A QUADRIVALENT injected vaccine. This is for adults aged 18 and over but below the age of 65 who are at increased risk from flu because of a long-term health condition and for children 6 months and above in an eligible group who cannot receive the live vaccine
  • An ADJUVANTED TRIVALENT injected vaccine. This is for people aged 65 and over. If you will be aged 65 and over on March 31 2019 – that is, you were born on or before March 31 1954. So, if you are currently 64 but will be 65 on March 31 2019, you do qualify.

If your child is aged between 6 months and 2 years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they will be offered an injected flu vaccine as the nasal spray is not licensed for children under 2.

 

Flu vaccine for people with medical conditions

The injected flu vaccine is offered free of charge on the NHS to anyone with a serious long-term health condition, including:  

 

This list of conditions isn't definitive. It's always an issue of clinical judgement.

Your GP can assess you to take into account the risk of flu making any underlying illness you may have worse, as well as your risk of serious illness from flu itself. The vaccine should always be offered in such cases, even if you are not technically in one of the risk groups above. If you live with someone who has a weakened immune system, you may also be advised to have a flu vaccine. Speak to your GP about this.


 

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